Proper nutrition can make a big difference in adolescent performance. 

 

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Nutrition For Young Athletics 1.1 06082019 Handout / Show Notes

Eating Hygiene 

Eating hygiene is about maximising the breakdown of food extracting the most energy possible, so digestion does not become congested and you more aware of how to eat. It’s “good nutrition to maximise performance” — not performance over the cost of good nutrition.

How to eat to maximise your performance  

Step one 

  • Ask this question, am I hungry? Sit down close your eyes and check-in with yourself.
  • Notice the feelings of hunger like — hunger pains, grumbling stomach and low energy. Hunger is different from cravings. Cravings usual appear as strong thoughts like “that looks yummy”. 

Step two 

  • Decide what to eat, choose foods that have high nutritional value and support sports goals.

Eating Hygiene

 

Step three 

  • When sitting down to eat, minimise distractions. If you are distracted, refocus on your food.
  • Calm yourself before eating.  
  • Take your time. Eat slowly. Put your fork down after taking a bite. You cannot concentrate if you are loading your fork. Digestion is not a race. 
  • Chew your food 20 to 25 times per mouthful. No talking while chewing. This will help to increase nutrient absorption and improve the amount of energy, ATP (Adenosine triphosphate) you get from the food you are eating and as a result, improving your athletic performance.

What to Eat, the Day Before a Game or Competition.

Eat 5-6 small meals spread out over the day. This builds energy without making you tried and provides regular nutrition.

start 1.2

Breakfast 

  • Porridge with banana, prunes and sunflower seeds with milk of your choice (A2, almond, etc.).
  • High protein muesli with hot water and or warm milk of your choice.
  • Sanitarium Weet-Bix for Kids (low in sugar) with hot water or warm milk of your choice.
  • Quinoa porridge with banana or grated apple and milk of your choice.
  • Puffed millet cereal with warm milk of your choice.
  • Poach eggs on sourdough toast (wheat or light rye) sourdough is beneficial for good gut health.
  • Sourdough toast with avocado, cheddar cheese and a slice of tomato.

Morning Tea

  • Smoothie: 3 strawberries, 1/4 cup of oats, 1 tbsp natural yoghurt, 1 cup milk of your choice.
  • Banana, apple with a small handful of nuts — if allowed.
  • Celery and carrot sticks with hummus or avocado dip.

Lunch

  • Ham or chicken salad sandwich on sourdough bread (light rye, wheat, etc.)
  • Quinoa salad with salmon or your choice of protein
  • Spinach and bacon quiche with salad (it is wise to use organic nitrate-free bacon)
  • Brown rice with diced chicken, carrots, red capsicum and green beans

Afternoon Tea 

  • Sourdough toast with avocado and slice of tomato.*
  • Low sugar, baked beans on sourdough toast.*
  • Celery and carrot sticks with hummus or avocado dip.*
  • Cheddar cheese and quinoa rice thins.*

*good meals for study

Dinner

  • Roast chicken, sweet potato, carrots, and pumpkin and steamed greens.
  • Grilled fish with steamed green vegetable and brown rice.
  • Chicken drumsticks with steamed vegetables.
  • Small serving your choice of red meat with your choice of vegetables.
  • Homemade chicken and vegetable soup with noodles.

What to Eat the Day of a Game or Competition 

Eat small snacks regularly. Don’t eat anything heavy two hours before the event. Too much fibre may cause gastrointestinal distress, nausea, vomiting. Keep hydrated with water through the day.

Breakfast 

– Eat a light breakfast 2 hours before your sports event you don’t want to weigh yourself down.

  • Oat or quinoa porridge with milk of your choice (A2, almond, etc.)
  • Sanitarium Weet-Bix for Kids (low sugar) with hot water or warm milk of your choice
  • Smoothie: 3 strawberries, 1/4 cup of oats, 1 tbsp natural yoghurt, 1 cup milk of your choice

Morning tea

– When in between a race or at halftime, eat light snacks like.

  • Orange 
  • Strawberries 
  • Watermelon

Lunch 

– Eat a small and light meal for lunch if you are still competing.

  • Salad sandwich with the protein of your choice on sourdough bread.
  • Rice thins with salmon or a light protein of your choice. 

Afternoon tea

– Eat a light snack when in-between race or game.    

  • Orange
  • Strawberries 
  • Watermelon  
  • Rice thin and avocado
  • Smoothie: 3 strawberries, 1/4 cup of oats, 1 tbsp yoghurt, 1 cup milk of your choice.

Dinner

 – After the sports day, it is wise to eat a balanced meal to help repair and restore the body. 

  • Roast chicken, sweet potato, carrots, and pumpkin and steamed greens. 
  • Grilled fish with steamed green vegetables and brown rice.
  • Chicken drumsticks with steamed vegetables of your choice. 
  • Red meat with vegetables of your choice. 

Details are available in the handout  – Nutrition For Young Athletics 1.1 06082019 Handout

Disclaimer: These suggestions are for education purposes and are not to constitute medical advice. If you have diabetes, celiac disease, allergies or any other medical condition, please see a health professional for medical conditions before changing your diet.

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